• Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Focus on Culture

    Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Focus on Culture

    Africa’s strengths are in its cultures and history, making it essential to understand these if we are to study contemporary African developments.

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  • Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Political Life

    Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Political Life

    There are few aspects of contemporary African life as dynamic and pivotal as African politics. Citizens across the continent seek responsive and representative governments that can deliver on much-needed development goals and end conflicts.

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  • Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Focus on Economics and Development

    Discover African Studies at Georgetown: Focus on Economics and Development

    The issues of economics, finance, markets and development have become increasingly essential to understanding contemporary Africa.

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From the Director

Welcome to African Studies at Georgetown. Our program offers a unique window into a vital, dynamic, but frequently misunderstood, region of the world: sub-Saharan Africa. Africa is a place of incredible contradictions: it is on the margins of world trade and investment, yet throughout modern history, Africa’s people and resources have been essential to development elsewhere; Africa is incredibly rich in resources, but it is plagued with some of the world’s most entrenched poverty ...






The African Studies Program  is proud to announce the appointment of Dr. Ken Ochieng’ Opalo as Assistant Professor of African Development.  Dr. Opalo will begin teaching at Georgetown in the Fall Semester 2015.  A brief bio appears below.

Ken Opalo will join the African Studies Program in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service in Fall 2015 as an Assistant Professor. He specializes in Comparative Politics, with a regional focus on Africa. His research interests include political institutions in emerging democracies, legislative politics, natural resource management, elections and elite political stability, and the political economy of development. Prof. Opalo is currently working on a book manuscript titled “Institutions and Political Change: Legislative Development in Emerging Democracies” that explains the variation in institutionalization and strength of African legislatures. He was previously a visiting scholar at the Program of African Studies at Northwestern University and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Center for Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law at Stanford University. His research has been funded by the Susan Ford Dorsey Fellowship from the Center for African Studies at Stanford University. He received his BA from Yale University and his PhD from Stanford University.

Prof. Opalo has traveled, worked or conducted research in ten different African countries. He has also served as a consultant for the Kofi Annan Foundation and the World Bank. He blogs at www.kenopalo.com





Undergraduate African Studies Certificate Students - Class of 2015 with Faculty Members